How to Find Your Audiences Whenever They Are Online with Marty Weintraub [Podcast]

In this episode, our guest is Marty Weintraub. He is the founder of AimClear, a driven Integrated Marketing Agency dominant in customer acquisition and winner of 17 US Search Awards, including 5X most recent Best Integrated Agency. AimClear’s differentiator is the balance of holistic brand-builds, PR, data, and integrated performance marketing.

About Marty and AimClear

[4:53]

AimClear considers themselves as entrepreneurs and marketers. Marty is a photographer and Speaker, and he founded AimClear in 2007. They are a driven integrated marketing agency and are great at getting new customers.

[5:28]

What makes them different is the way they think about campaigns and how their strategy is performance-based. They’ve gotten to work with some really amazing clients over the years. They have a large office in Duluth, Minnesota, and another office in St. Paul.

What does Integrated Digital Marketing mean?

[6:03]

It means how things work together. Integrated marketing, as an example, could be how we see results from running a branding campaign. We see more direct traffic, a higher site-wide conversion rate, and performance marketing.

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[6:34]

Integrated is the way things work together. It’s the effect of paid search and the effect of SEO. It also means sequencing messages from channel to channel in a coherent lifecycle pathway to purchase. When you think about the attribution path, a pathway to conversion, integrated means sculpting that in advance and making sure that we’re sequencing coherent messages from channel to channel and always using data to figure out how to do that better.

 

Is the quote, “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted. The trouble is, I don’t know which half,” still relevant?

[8:10]

Not so much for top-level marketers. The only reason to throw spaghetti at the wall and not know how it’s being spent is if either the marketers don’t know what to do or the system is broken. These days, there shouldn’t be very much trouble figuring out which half is useful.

 

What AimClear is doing that results in their success

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[11:57]

Marty is really rigorous about the targeting piece. They have a checklist that they go through for audience targeting that divides up the first and third-party data.

[13:39]

AimClear has always been into developing personas and has always been concerned with the intersection of paid and organic targeting and how they are augmenting themselves. 

[14:43]

They’ve also always believed in branding. The ultimate branding is a sale. Branding is actually the ultimate no-cookie-targeting as well. 

Recommendations for someone who is just starting

[15:27]

Your audience research needs to be about segmenting your data by who they are and attack what they aim to do.

[15:57]

First, look for integrated search and psychographic. We want to know what they’re asking for and who they are. What makes targeting is the ability to serve an ad to them, send an email to them, or reach out to them, and if you can’t address them with some kind of paid or organic media, it’s not targeting.

[16:29]

Undertake integrated search and psychographic research. We want to know where we can target them. These days, it’s about understanding there are different ways to know your audience. Many times, it’s from your CRM. There are tools now where we can reverse engineer email addresses and a CRM by third party display inventory that includes intent.

[17:10]

Identify any audience data targeting lists that the client might have. If we go deeper into this, it would be social engagement, retargeting pixels, CRM data. Look at that and recommend either segmentation or different ways to target those lists.

[18:14]

Look at the social targeting generators. It gets down into the weeds. We need to know who they are and where we can get at that pieces of them.

How is advertising available for anyone right now?

[19:47]

The brand Zuko is about the democratization of third-party display data. They offer it across the OTT (over-the-top) networks. They have 150 data partners, and they made their own targeting taxonomy of common denominators. They made their own targeting outline to get enough volume by combining various data partners. You could scrape a video from YouTube, upload a banner, and then blanket an area of the country everywhere, or you can layer psychographics on top.

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[20:42]

We’re going to see a generation pop-up that does interesting things. There are deep tools with some workflow features. With these tools, they’re becoming available to midsize agencies and even smaller agencies. You just have to be prepared to overpay until you’re at a high volume of media spend. 

Targeting Clients

[24:25]

You could serve banner ads or videos to a person serving in healthcare settings who have the potential for direct or indirect exposure to patients or infectious materials, including body substances.

[25:14]

In the olden days, as digital marketers, if we wanted to imply perhaps more conservative political views, we would need to add a layer of that. If we lay another targeting attribute over that, start with conservative politics with the operator. Understand if there’s any extra perspective that you’re applying by the distribution channel.

Inventories and Digital Commercials

[28:15]

Using DSPs can sometimes get you premium space and networks that you can buy directly, including Google. The inventory comes from different places depending on what network you’re dealing with, and that’s all handled behind the scenes.

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[28:58]

It can range from traditional banner video space, which can be pretty inexpensive, to very expensive, depending on the competitiveness of the space. These days, DSPs are various degrees of transparency for how much you’re paying on markup for them being the middle person on the data. Marketers use this programmatic data, and their game is to keep the cost low by only doing subtractive targeting and ruling out everybody who wouldn’t buy it, which is a counterintuitive use of the data.

The Most Efficient Way to Sell Something Now

[32:32]

The answer is always going to be paid search. IIf there’s search inventory, just as a marketer, the best way and easiest way to sell something is when somebody is asking for it now, and it has shopping intent.

[32:44]

There are new niche products where you could get them with social or display inventory. If Marty were to choose between one platform or the other, and it was Google or Facebook, he’s going to pick the Google ecosystem because they have everything inside it that he needs.

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[34:35]

For any product, there is a top of the funnel. The top of the funnel is the perspective marketplace. You could catch them in all different places and all different ways, but that is the group of people. 

The Universal Truth

[36:44]

The best marketing is a product that doesn’t suck. You could have a product that is just miraculous, everybody wants it, and you’re the only one who has it. Your job as a marketer is not to screw it up.

[37:46]

The universal truth of all of us about changing is like what Michelangelo said about the sculptor, “It already exists in the stone, and the job of the sculptor is to remove the barriers between the outside and the beauty.” Marketing is like that too. The number one attribute you want in a marketing campaign is for the client or the product.

[40:14]

If you can get that customer to buy a product that you know they’re going to fall in love with based upon the research you’ve done around their audience, chances are, they’re going to become more important. At the end of the day, if you’re just going for traffic or for quick sales, and you’re shipping out something in bad packaging, chances are you’re not going to have that return customer. You’re not going to get the ROI that you’re looking for from a marketing perspective.

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Awards

[41:43]

Awards are important just because it just means that you have success with your place, your stakeholders, and your brand that you work for the agency’s clients.

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